Don’t Tread on Me

Connie and me on our way to Sunday Mass, Tampa 1964.

Connie and me on our way to Sunday Mass, Tampa 1964.

Lately, I’ve been reading Francis Fukuyama’s, The Origins of Political Order, which is one of the best if not the best world history I’ve read.  Generally, I hedge my bets when it comes to book reviews, but I am extremely impressed with this historian.  His credentials include time at the U.S. State Department, and Johns Hopkins and George Mason universities. He is presently at Stanford in California.

I’ve read many of the authors and books he cites, so I have some idea of Fukuyama’s understanding of the world.  He is basically a Weberian (German historian) and is rightly critical of the Marxist interpretation of history which has been somewhat discredited in scholarly circles.

This is a long book, and dense in places.  For example, Fukuyama’s discussion of the history of China is exhausting, however, he is thorough and very objective in my opinion.

In a week or so, I will write another review for Goodreads which will include some of the insights I gained from reading this book.  I will also read more of Fukuyama’s works.

                                                               —000—

Next week promises to be as busy as last week as the calendar fills with medical appointments, garden work and home repair.  David’s doctor’s scheduler called and worked with me to arrange the pre-op “stuff” for his joint replacement surgery, September 21. David can’t remember many things these days, so the memory work is mine.  I write it down.  He doesn’t like to keep notes, but I think it’s critical.

Last week I saw my dermatologist for my three-month check-up and had another biopsy on the toe that will not heal.  She also froze a place on my hand that I predict from past experience will return. I predict when she finally biopsies it, it will be another cancer.  She quizzed me about my visit with the oncologist and had me sign a release form concerning that visit. she was annoyed his office hadn’t sent her something as she was the referring doctor.

Meanwhile, I had another mammogram last week and the results say I am free of cancer.  In fact, the results said my breasts are 97 percent fat.  That shocked me as usually the doctor tells me my breasts are ‘clear’ and that’s that.  I really hadn’t thought much about what is inside breast tissue.  And I don’t know what it means either, i.e. is it good bad, or meaningless?  Obviously, it’s yet another place to hide fat!

                                                               —000—

Daughter Connie texted from the road yesterday.  She and SIL Bill drove a car to Virginia Tech for the youngest granddaughter (a senior this year), and on the return trip they had three flat tires. She says Bill got every car squared away but his own.

Chris, Rita’s beau, is shipping out to the Middle East tomorrow, and he sold his car to Hannah.  As Chris is a mechanic (works on those big vehicles the military uses), so Hannah got a great car.

The two other granddaughters live in Newport News and are both independent. Amelia, having finished her M.A. at UVA, is beginning her school year (she teaches high school science) and Rita working her management job with a large company whose name I can’t remember.

 Mike the plumber returns tomorrow to crawl under the house and locate the source of the water draining into the crawl space. Meanwhile, I have updated the emission sticker and license plate on my car (got the VA plate that says Don’t Tread on Me), and the county decals on both cars that say we paid our property taxes.  David has to do something with his car Monday, but I forgot what.  I should have written it down. I’ll be around to visit friends later today, after I fix breakfast and this migraine clears up.

11 thoughts on “Don’t Tread on Me

  1. I will have to tell Gregg about this book. He reads it first, I read it second and then we enjoy discussing it. Looks like you have had and will be having a busy week. Good catching up on all your news.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s