What lies beneath?

Once the killing fields, Williamsburg today.

Once the killing fields, Williamsburg today.

When people say, “Forget the past” I cringe.  I love past times.

More reading this morning, The Barbarous Years. Worked my way from Virginia through Maryland to the Dutch colony around the Hudson River (New York today).

The seventeenth century in the English colonies of Virginia and Maryland was pretty bad.  When the colonists and aborigines weren’t killing each other they were killing each other.  Seems the tribes hated each other as did the colonists who could not quite escape the excesses of the English Civil War or the religious wars. And when they weren’t killing each other, disease and starvation killed the others. Of course, its a mixed story, some people within any ethnic or racial group were kind.  I tell David he should be happy his ancestors were Russian or German migrants who came later.  The English certainly didn’t like each other.

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Fixed Chinese pork “barbecue” and stir-fry Bok Choi for our Sunday lunch.  A recipe from Diabetic Living magazine.  David is pre-diabetic and taking Metformin so I try to feed him low starch meals.  I eat them too, of course, and then eat something sweet.  I am a sugar addict.  Comes from living in the South for years and years where the staple food is GASS or grease, alcohol, sugar, and salt.  I don’t have issues with three of them, but sugar is a weakness.

Our weather here is wonderful.  we’ve been able to walk the dogs for several days, and we almost have a heat wave outside.  Thus, the weather forecast for this week includes another cold front.

Yesterday, when I walked Johnny, my first outing since the fall on the ice, Cathy (Kathy’s next door neighbor) stopped me on the street and asked how I was doing.  She told me kindly she would walk the dogs anytime.  So kind.  Cathy is another breast cancer survivor.

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So, I’m working on my tree, and what do I discover?  Anne Dudley Bradstreet. I immediately texted the news to my daughter who has two degrees in English and is as keen on genealogy as I am.  So, I didn’t stop working on the Dudley line after all.

Wiki says: Anne was born in Northampton, England, 1612, the daughter of Thomas Dudley, a steward of the Earl of Lincoln, and Dorothy Yorke. Due to her family’s position, she grew up in cultured circumstances and was a well-educated woman for her time, being tutored in history, several languages and literature. At the age of sixteen she married Simon Bradstreet. Both Anne’s father and husband were later to serve as governors of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Anne and Simon, along with Anne’s parents, emigrated to America aboard the Arbella as part of the Winthrop Fleet of Puritan emigrants in 1630. She first touched American soil on June 14, 1630 at what is now Pioneer Village (Salem, Massachusetts) with Simon, her parents and other voyagers as part of the Puritan migration to New England (1620–1640). Due to the illness and starvation of Gov. John Endecott and other residents of the village, their stay was very brief. Most moved immediately south along the coast to Charlestown, Massachusetts for another short stay before moving south along the Charles River to found “the City on the Hill,” Boston, Massachusetts.

AnnebradstreetAnne_Bradstreet_Memorial_N_Andover_Cem

15 thoughts on “What lies beneath?

  1. Liked the insight into early American history. We often are treated to reports lauding the “good old days.” Were they?

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    • David’s dad used to say (having been in WWI and lived through the Depression, WWII and the Cold War) that the “good old days” weren’t that good.” My thought is that things are not worse or better, just different. I don’t have much faith in change or progress.

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  2. That grave stone is in excellent condition.
    You have such nice, caring neighbors. Cathy and Kathy are very kind to you and David.
    Stir fry is good for quick cooking, but beware of using too much oil. I don’t care much for oily food.

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  3. I’ve never tried bok choi… We love stirfrys … I use a lot of those bags of coleslaw mix. Put some in the stirfrys at the last minute and some straight from the package in the bottom of the bowl, where the noodles would go if we still ate them, which we don’t . Because of the reasons that you know all about.

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    • I had eaten Bok Choi prepared by others, but this was my first attempt to cook it. A very mild cabbage. I will use in soup in the future, and stir fry of course. I bought some of the Asian slaw and we tried to eat it raw. Your idea to stir fry and use it in place of noodles sounds promising.

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  4. Fabulous discovery! Nice the headstones and such are so well maintained. Like bok choy too. Have had it sauteed with mushrooms, onions and eggs for breakfast. Well, one egg, I’m on metformin too. Delish!

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