Why does everything have to be so complex?

7d422941-c113-4e9b-9d11-c527d4b93116Following the purchase of software to clean and protect my computer, I’ve had a tussle the past few days. Company #1 (the seller) deals with company #2 (billing), while company #3 handles the tech stuff.  Perhaps you know the drill if you’ve purchased software for your computer lately.

Eventually, I hooked up with a nice fellow named Sergio in the Ukraine and a gal somewhere else, who hopefully got it all straightened out. Next I went to my credit card company to put flags on multiple charges for the same item. (Got to check that every day also.)  David with two desktops and one laptop giving him fits has been experiencing a similar situation. I won’t bore you with all these details, but will say…its a good thing neither of us is senile…yet!

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Meanwhile as I marvel over the ease with which I can become entangled in the wonderful software and millions of records associated with Ancestry.com, the contrast in my parents backgrounds becomes more and more clear.

First I discovered yet another of Dad’s Puritan ancestors, one Stephen Batchilder, a minister with a divinity degree from Oxford University in England (1586), who after becoming an ordained minister assigned to a church in Hampshire, emigrated to America in 1632, during the Great Puritan Migration.  As noted in the sign above, Stephen led  his band of faithful followers into the wilds of Massachusetts where they established Hampton (Later in NH), a “free town for free men.”

Wiki says:  In March 1635, Richard Dummer and John Spencer of the Byfield section in Newbury, came round in their shallop, came ashore at the landing and were much impressed by the location. Dummer, who was a member of the General Court, got that body to lay its claim to the section and plan a plantation here. The Massachusetts General Court of March 3, 1636 ordered that Dummer and Spencer be given power to “To presse men to build there a Bound house”.  

The town was settled in 1638 by a group of parishioners led by Reverend Stephen Bachiler, who had formerly preached at the settlement’s namesake: Hampton, England.  Incorporated in 1639, the township once included Seabrook, Kensington, Danville, Kingston, East Kingston, Sandown, North Hampton and Hampton Falls.

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What amazes me is that I actually found Stephen’s Oxford University record, as well as the passenger records for him and his followers.

Although some of my distant cousins went on to become movers and shakers in the new world (mayors, governors and such), I am descended from one of the younger of Stephen’s many daughters.

Excepting a Green Bay Packer player, our branch of the family is far less illustrious, although far as I know, our line mostly retained an appreciation for education and religion until my generation.

On the other hand, searching through Mom’s family records later yesterday, I discovered Mom’s grandmother Jane, a devout Methodist of Dutch descent, who at age one in 1862, immigrated steerage class with her family from Bremen, Germany.  Jane worked as a servant girl before she married my grandfather, also of Dutch descent, and a laborer in a brick yard in Grand Rapids Michigan. Jane’s oldest son, my Mom’s dad, went on the become the Superintendent of the Joe Wheeler TVA Dam in Alabama before he died.

Rev. Stephen Bachiler Memorial This is a memorial stone and plaque to Rev. Stephen Bachiler and the first settlers of Hampton in 1638. It reads: A little band of pioneers under the leadership of Rev. Stephen Bachiler of Southhampton, England, seeking a larger liberty, in October 1638 settled in the wilderness near this spot to plant a free church in a free town. They were joined in 1639 by others and in that year the town was incorporated. To do honor to the founders and fathers of Hampton, to exalt the ideals for which they strove, and as an inspiration to posterity, this memorial is dedicated, October 14, 1925.

Rev. Stephen Bachiler Memorial

This is a memorial stone and plaque to Rev. Stephen Bachiler and the first settlers of Hampton Massachusetts in 1638. It reads:

A little band of pioneers under the leadership of Rev. Stephen Bachiler of Southhampton, England, seeking a larger liberty, in October 1638 settled in the wilderness near this spot to plant a free church in a free town. They were joined in 1639 by others and in that year the town was incorporated. To do honor to the founders and fathers of Hampton, to exalt the ideals for which they strove, and as an inspiration to posterity, this memorial is dedicated, October 14, 1925.

23 thoughts on “Why does everything have to be so complex?

  1. Like your’s my tree is already so large I have abandoned huge portions of it to focus in on those whom I can still find stories for. But the internet makes the world a small place. Jane’s oldest son was likely my grandfather’s supervisor. My grandfather was a machinist there between 1935 and 1966. I played regularly on the lake that was created by the dam in Cherokee AL and in the Tennessee River between Wheeler and Wilson Dams near Tuscumbia AL.

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    • Lisa, Wow. This is really neat. My grandfather took me inside the dam one day and bought me a coke from one of those big red coke machines. I told my Mom, now I know what Grandpa does, he uses all that water (in the lake) to make Coca Cola, and when it’s finished it pops out of a big red box.

      Grandpa was Supervisor of the damn when he died (through the 1940s).

      I too played around the lake. When my Dad was out of work, we lived with my grandparents in Town Creek. I think that was the name of the TVA settlement. So many memories of that time. Thanks for leaving a comment.

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      • I remember standing on top of the Dam with both of my grandfathers one afternoon. They were neighbors and friends and both were machinists. My grandfather was explaining to the other the workings of the locks. Not long after that I was in school in Atlanta and one of my teachers was going by the book that had gotten the history wrong. I corrected her and was soundly scolded. The next day she came back to class and apologized to me. Apparently the information I had gotten from my grandfather was correct. Unfortunately, I never got a coke from the machines. Coca Cola was a rare treat when I was growing up and was used as a reward for major accomplishments.

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    • There is no end to the tree. The English records are wonderful. I have pretty good records for the Dutch and German ancestors, but have more difficulty if they haven’t been translated. I have one of the English lines back to the 1200s but the others are done only back to the 1600s, or in some cases as with Stephen Batchilder the 1500s.

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  2. I am so impressed with all you’ve discovered. I hope you’ll be binding them in a book for your children and grandchildren. As for complicated, you should have seen what Art went through yesterday with online banking.

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  3. Hello again, so sorry Dianne. I’ve just been reading the comments as I moderate them and I was a bit late publishing them today. Those biscuits with the Union Jack on them I bought them at the base just before Christmas. They are Walkers. I think they may have been a special for the holidays but not really sure on that. They were in a very small tin and there were eight biscuits total.

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  4. The detective work on your ancestry is impressive Dianne and it is so very interesting. Sorry about the problems you’ve had. My in-laws had one with a scammer recently but thankfully it has sorted itself out.

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