Monday Meandering


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Lately, WordPress has been linking each current post I write to three posts I wrote in the past.  I looked at a few of the older posts and then offered a prayer that my writing had improved. Blog writing like every other kind of writing should improve with practice…right?

Because I was mostly a B student when it came to English classes, I never believed I would become a writer.  It wasn’t that I didn’t like literature, I loved it. But my creative writing skills were almost non-existent.

Various professors, especially History professors said that writing was a critical part of their coursework, so I made a supreme effort to improve my writing skills. I took writing course after writing course on subject after subject. Today, I have a shelf full of books on writing. Actually I have a book case full of books on writing, including five copies of various editions of Strunk and White, several copies of the Chicago Manual of Style, and others.

Although I mostly worked with statistics, every job I had after I finished my B.A. involved writing. And every boss I had made different demands on my writing skills. I finally learned that writing is a subjective sport and the referees disagree.

                                                                  —000—

IMG_0613Yesterday, to bribe David into driving me all the way to the Beltway, I promised him we would stop at the Heidelberg Deli/Bakery/Grocery and buy him a bratwurst. As it was Sunday, they were closed, so I suggested we could stop there when we run errands on Thursday. Later in the day, I tried to remember where we had been, and after a few moments realized we had driven to the garden center where I found a couple of African Violets.

Feeling chuffed by my recent success with them, I looked at the Orchids in the hot house, but they were far too pricey for me. Thus, I bought two African Violets and a bag of violet potting soil for $16.  I can afford that.  I’ve grown African violets for over fifty years and never lost one until the mice attacked them a few years back. I mean who knew mice would chew on the leaves? One of the violets, a white one survived with TLC, but the others croaked.  I wanted real violet colored African Violets or Saintpaulia, to give them a proper name. Native to Tanzania and Kenya, they are threatened rain forest plants.  However, there are millions of them residing in homes near and far.

20 thoughts on “Monday Meandering

  1. At the risk of ignoring your post, I must say the header photo was startling. I, too, have always thought parakeets were tropical.

    Love the blue and white pot with the violets. Reminds me of one I have that belonged to my mom.

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    • Some parakeets are from Australia. These monk parrots come from the southern part of South America. Parrots range from warm to cold climates and from rain forests to semiarid places like Mexico and the grasslands of northern Africa. many escaped parrots are making North America their homeland.

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  2. Good observations about writing. I gradually got away from personal creations as job demands changed over the years. It was difficult to start in again. I think we all make some improvements with practice.

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    • The Monk Parakeet or Quaker Parrot is native to the Tierra Templada or temperate parts of South America. Feral colonies have formed in NYC and Chicago. Cold does not bother them. This photo comes from NYC and someone in one of my bird groups sent it to me. I have a Quaker named Jesse.

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  3. There is certainly an element of subjectivity in writing — as there is in beauty, art, music — but we all know good writing when we see it, and we also all know when we’re bored and confused and wondering why we’re reading something. But there’s no subjectivity to house plants. I kill them every time.

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  4. I had no idea mice ate the violets! I keep telling my grandkids to pay attention to their writing, they resist it but every job I had required extensive writing and I’d was grateful for the all classes I took,

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