Rocks part II

Connie at Hunama Bay, Oahu, Hawaii, January 1968

Connie at Hunama Bay, Oahu, Hawaii, January 1968

Dianne in Salem Massachusetts, 1990

Dianne in Salem Massachusetts, 1990

David in the gardens, house of the seven gables, Salem, Massachusetts, 1990

David in the gardens, house of the seven gables, Salem, Massachusetts, 1990

This post is linked to Nature Notes.

The dates on the second and third photos above are approximate.  David and I visited New England several times, and I traveled to Boston on business and for pleasure at different times before and after I met David.  David and I also traveled through New England on the train, en route to Quebec for the world-wide meeting of the AA fellowship in Canada, in 1985?

Dates are so important when you work on genealogy tables. If you build the timeline you find more clues.  Otherwise, you come to a dead end. Literally.

I snapped the photo of daughter Connie at Hanama Bay, on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, in January 1968. I remember the date vividly because I was a Girl Scout leader, and had been camping with my girls at the bay for three days and nights. We earned our camping badges, but came home with soaked bedding, tents and selves.  It rains a lot in Hawaii, especially around the beginning of the New Year. Surprisingly, none of the kids complained.  Girls are a tough lot.

                                                                —000—

The photos above show different kinds of rocks. Connie is sitting on the remains of an ancient lava bed.  Lava is the bedrock of the islands, unlike the mainland where we find many other kinds of rock formations.  Here in Virginia, we have a surplus of rock, which makes geology a favorite course for many youngsters.

I am sitting on a different kind of rock in the second photo. I added the photo of David for balance and to show the opposite of rocks…flowers.

 As anyone who has followed my posts for a while knows, one of my pastimes for decades, since I was a kid, has been visiting graveyards. And, I have visited hundreds of them.

For a couple of years, I lived in base housing in the middle of a graveyard at the Marine Corps station at Quantico, Virginia where my oldest two children were born. There we were, life in the midst of death.  It was a peaceful place.

I found many family graves in New England, particularly New Hampshire. Sometimes grave markers are so worn, you can’t read the inscription.  They have returned to their true nature as rocks.

A grave marker

A grave marker.  I have no idea whose.

   

19 thoughts on “Rocks part II

  1. That’s a very interesting stone grave stone. When I lived in New England I loved meandering in the old cemetaries even when I couldn’t always decipher the memorials.

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    • Actually, I don’t recall the origin of the last photo, the result of failing to place an identifying label on it.

      I found a photo with similar markings on the Internet. Looks as if it either identifies the source of the Po river in Italy, or was chucked into the Po at some point. At any rate tourists and others love to photograph it.

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  2. We also enjoy New England trips. We’re hoping to go this September again. You are the 2nd person to post about volcanoes today. The only one I’ve ever been to was Yellowstone National Park. If that one goes again, it will be an extinction event.

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  3. Oahu has become very urbanized, but the Big Island is virtually the same. We enjoyed flying in a helicopter over the erupting volcano and over old Hilo. Another island that is still the same is Kauai. We flied in a helicopter over Na Pali (the cliffs) and also saw beautiful waterfalls. We have been on every island, including Lanai and Molokai and Maui.

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    • Two of my cousins live on the Big Island and nephew Adam and his family live in Honolulu. Thomas Wolfe said “You can’t go home again.” I like my memories of living there with my kids just after it became a state.

      As for rock formations like the waterfalls and the Pali, Hawaii is certainly at the top of the list. The East Coast of the US is much older in geological time, however, and has many more kinds of rocks. The Uararrie (sp) Mountains in NC are some of the oldest land forms on earth.

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  4. I have never been to Salem. Went ot Taunton in Massachusettes once where my mother-in-law is from. We lived in Rhode Island for a while back in Gregg’s navy days and visited Boston where his step-grandfather lived. I would like to go back to Boston again one day and explore more of New England. I enjoy walking around graveyards also, you can see a lot of history in them. Hoping to get back to Hawaii for our 40th anniversary also. I love visiting there

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