Busy as a bee

Rice cooker

My rice cooker

Suddenly, things got busy around here. Either that or I am slowing down. Advice for those about to retire…you will be busier than ever after you retire, and wonder how in the world you worked fulltime and had a commute both ways to work five days per week and had time for anything else (you didn’t).

For example, lately, I have been doing more cooking and actually enjoying it. I have discovered it makes a difference to have finally assembled the correct tools and ingredients. 

I’m inspired by friend’s cooking efforts. In addition, my weight loss regime and David’s preDiabetic diet drive me to be creative in the kitchen. I didn’t do much cooking while I was working outside the home. I don’t know what we ate or where, but I suspect we ate out…a lot, and that’s very unhealthy.

For example, I found a recipe in my Weight Watchers Point Plus Cookbook for ‘Bruleed Jasmine Rice Pudding’ and at present have six ramekins of rice pudding cooling in the fridge. They will go under the broiler later today. David found the Thai Jasmine rice at the grocery store, and the oven-safe ramekins I ordered from Amazon arrived via UPS just as I was ready to dish up the pudding.

This lovely WW recipe and a “Martha Stewart cooking lesson” on the preparation of perfect rice inspired me to purchase a REAL Zojirushi rice cooker (mfg in China), but not before I cooked “boil in a bag” brown rice with ginger chicken for my daughter and granddaughter Hannah on Wednesday. I’ve had this recipe for over 40 years.

When he was in first grade, Richard (my oldest son)’s class assembled (with the help of Room Mothers) a Mother’s Day cookbook and the Ginger Chicken recipe was included. I hadn’t cooked the dish in 30+ years. I fixed it often when my kids were growing up.   

Meanwhile, neighbor Cathy invited me for lunch at her home today, to meet two of the friars from the Franciscan Abby in Washington DC. She has been escorting them (one visiting from Austria) around town. She says she took them to Robert E. Lee’s home, Arlington House, earlier this week. English: Arlington House also known as the Rob...

The good news…Cathy says there is an elevator in the National Cathedral to lift David and me to the clerestory. I haven’t been there in ages either. I’m looking forward to the tea and tour next Wednesday.   

 

18 thoughts on “Busy as a bee

  1. I agree that retirement does not mean sitting in front of the TV …especially if you do some Volunteering. I look forward to my 2 days a week at our Free Care Clinic. It’s been my push to get going so many times when I felt like lazing at home … and I’m always glad when it does !

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    • This area is so wealthy and so filled with left-leaning inhabitants you have to fight to get a volunteer job. David has applied several places including our hospital, where he would assist people requiring a wheel chair, and been turned down.I have done volunteer work at several historic locations. Many people want these jobs too.

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  2. Retirement is wonderful because you can finally spend your time doing things that you enjoy. I cook more than I did while working. We ate a lot of packaged and frozen foods then. now we have more fresh.

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  3. There is also brown jasmine rice and one that looks black and has a taste similar to wild rice.If you have access to the food network one cook ,the Hungry Girl has some very tasty lower calorie dishes.

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  4. You know I feel as you do. I miss teaching and all my friends there, but retirement life is wonderful. I’ve never been crazy about cooking and now mom does most of it. I just started baking and found it a lot of fun. Now my uncle has brought over more ripe mango and I guess I’ll be back in the kitchen.

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  5. Well, I certainly have not been idle, either, having published 3 books, newspaper articles, and radio commentaries. Lol. I am still trying to perfect recipes for quiche and pasta salad.

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  6. I will definitely second the notion that time fills up fast when you’re retired. Fortunately, most of the things we do now are enjoyable rather than perfunctory.

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